December Meeting Review, Tentative Agenda for January Meeting

Agenda for Monthly Progressive Business Meeting

1/2/18

7-9pm

24 Mill St., Newark, OH

Subject to Change

 

  • Introduction (5 Mins. 7:00-7:05)
  • Fair Districts = Fair Elections Update  (5 Mins. 7:05-7:10)
  • Summer of Labor (5 Mins. 7:10-7:15)
  • Democracy Day (5 Mins. 7:15-7:20)
  • Gazebo and Related Activism (5 Mins. 7:20-7:25)
  • Open Discussion (If Desired) (95 Mins. 7:25-9:00)
  • Adjourn (9:00)

 

 

Review of Progressive Meeting

12/5/17

 

  • There was no update on the Fair Districts-Fair Elections effort.
  • On the “Summer of Labor”: we will take a look at some dates for June-September for events and set them. This is based on the notion of “if you build it, they will come”. We will try to reach out to organized labor in the area to see if they are willing to help or at least if they want us to highlight any of their events. Additionally, we will see if the Freedom School would be interested in helping as well, since this is up their alley. Democracy Day planning to start in January.
  • Regarding the Newark Gazebo group: we are looking into how we can keep the momentum going. Create a website? Create a semi-regular newsletter? Do both and call the effort something such as “Newark Remembers”? Use this effort to not only promote bringing the Gazebo back – like with circulating the petition demanding as much – and holding those responsible for its removal accountable, but also to maintain consistent public pressure on local elected officials (reminding them that the people are watching as they conduct unpopular business such as with the Gazebo, the footbridge by St. Francis De Sales, and even the council pay-raise). Keeping the people informed is paramount to this effort.
  • Relative to the debate between progressives getting into the Party or going independent: the election for Democratic Club President is on the 12th, the Party/Club must offer progressives and others a reason to affiliate with and work hard for the Party/Club instead of remaining independent. The Party/Club must make an effort to support/promote the work of local (not just in Newark, but Countywide) efforts/events and to be bold enough to take a stand even when an issue is controversial. Being civil is crucial, but we must be assertive in promoting our ideals.
  • We discussed the emerging effort called the “Working Families Initiative” which will seek to create a network with registered voters, register more voters, and help progressive candidates reach out to and fight on behalf of the working class without the distraction of “labels”.
  • Looking ahead, we will try to resolve to make our meetings shorter, more fun (maybe including food and drink), getting straight to action (people want to do something, not talk about it), and utilize online communication more effectively so that we can organize swift action and not waste time in boring meetings rehashing the same points repeatedly.

November Meeting Review and Tentative Agenda for December Meeting

Agenda for Monthly Progressive Business Meeting

12/5/17

7-9pm

24 Mill St., Newark, OH

Subject to Change

 

  • Introduction (5 Mins. 7:00-7:05)
  • Fair Districts = Fair Elections Update  (10 Mins. 7:05-7:15)
  • Summer of Labor (10 Mins. 7:15-7:25)
  • Gazebo and Related Activism (50 Mins. 7:25-8:15)
  • The Party v. Independence Discussion (30 Mins. 8:15-8:45)
  • Miscellaneous (15 Mins. 8:45-9:00)
  • Adjourn (9:00)

 

 

Review of Progressive Meeting

11/7/17

 

  • We discussed the angry response in the community to the nontransparent removal of the Gazebo via a unilateral decision by the Mayor, and the rumors of what was then some serious talk of a recall effort. We noted our experience in getting a measure on the ballot, discussed the strong possibility that a recall movement would fail, and noted that we would like to help these citizens figure out what their next plan of action should be in the most productive way possible. Also discussed was how the Mayor lashed out at the people asking questions and demanding answers and even suggested that he received more calls supporting his actions than in opposition.
  • We also, again, discussed our frustrations with the current state of the local Democratic Party, including the apparent lack of truly equal and high-quality help for ALL candidates. We reviewed the chaotic Club meeting in October and noted that the Club and the Party need reform. Included in this part of our discussion was the fact that the next Club officer election is in December and we covered the fact that the biggest reforms will have to transpire via the Central Committee of the Party, which includes positions elected by registered voters affiliated with the Democrats.

For Your Information – Call to Action

Recent bullet points of local information you might want to know, but may have missed:

 

  • Today marks the 6th anniversary of the creation of the 99% of Newark and East Central Ohio as inspired by the Occupy Movement. This group was the forerunner of the Licking County Progressives and had made history in 2016 when the small membership thereof successfully got the first ever citizen’s initiative on a ballot in Newark which itself was aimed at creating a Democracy Day to advocate for a U.S. Constitutional Amendment to overturn the Citizens United ruling. Earlier this year, the 99% group voted unanimously to merge with the Progressive group as the “transpartisan” branch/subgroup thereof in continuing the fight for our democracy and to combat the issues of inequality in our democracy, justice system, and the economy. Last month, this subgroup hosted the first annual Democracy Day event on Constitution Day.
  • A potentially critical debacle occurred at the October meeting of the Licking County Democratic Club. Most of the meeting was relatively peaceful, but things fell apart when a proposed amendment to the Club constitution to open up voting and elected officer qualifications to all residents of Licking County, regardless of citizenship. The proposal had been inspired by one particular activist whose contributed a considerable amount of his own time and money to the club’s efforts even though he is a Canadian citizen and is thereby barred by the aforementioned Constitution from being a full member of the club. The debate on the amendment quickly devolved into a shouting fest. There were some valid concerns expressed on the opposing side, but the proponents argued a change was essential to open the club to those currently without a voice in our community. Furthermore, it was pointed out that we are in serious danger of losing a chance at retaining the gains in membership of this year, let alone growing past it (especially since the above-noted activist has been a crucial part of that membership growing effort). A majority voted the proposal down with some calling for the next Club administration to take up the proposal again in an extensive effort with an eye towards making whatever changes must be made to satisfy all sides.
  • Licking County Democratic Club elections for officers to serve in 2018 are at the December 12th meeting at 2054 Cherry Valley Road in Newark. To vote in this election you must join the Club by Sunday, November 12th (per the Club Constitution’s rules). You can join by contributing $25 in person at the above-noted location (though, there is no November meeting for the Club) or by visiting https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/licking-county-democratic-club-1
  • On the elections of Club officers, this group would like to keep promoting progressive reforms within the party and the system overall. One way to achieve said reform is to attend these meetings and join these groups so that you can be heard. Staying home and otherwise refraining from active participation in person (as opposed to just doing so via social media) will do nothing to advance the cause of progressivism. We, the Licking County Progressives, strongly urge this membership to join the Club and prepare to support progressive reforms via progressive candidates for these offices.

Meeting Review for October 3rd Meeting and Tentative Schedule for November 7th Meeting

Agenda for Monthly Progressive Business Meeting

11/7/17

7-7:30pm (7:30-9pm = Election Night Party!)

24 Mill St., Newark, OH

 

  • Introduction / Fair Districts = Fair Elections Update  (5 Mins. 7:00-7:05)
  • Summer of Labor Update (10 Mins. 7:05-7:15)
  • Miscellaneous (15 Mins. 7:15-7:30)
  • Adjourn (7:30)

 

 

Review of Progressive Meeting

10/3/17

 

  • We discussed the progress for the Fair Districts Fair Elections effort: we have advised the local effort’s steering committee (based on our experience in collecting signatures) that polling locations are excellent places to get good signatures, and more counties have reportedly met their signature thresholds.
  • We discussed party/system reform beyond the issue of gerrymandering: noted that an open primary would be preferable (highlighted how it works in California and other states and how James Madison and the other founders established a nonpartisan system via our Constitution), in conjunction with the gerrymandering issue a partisan system produces an atmosphere where representatives adhere more to the will of their donors than the people’s or even their respective parties and that there is an exorbitant amount of time expended on raising money instead of reaching out to constituents, there are currently several ongoing efforts to bring reform to the party which will benefit everyone, one key issue is that the party must do more to establish a genuine choice for the people, presently the party is bogged down with discussing/promoting issues or causes that the average person doesn’t prioritize (in other words, noneconomic issues).
  • Continued reform discussion: we’ve allowed the people to be convinced that the tax debate is too complex, we must revitalize the party’s “backbone” in fighting for the working class (stop with the abstract issues, focus less on long meetings and direct more short activist briefings, acknowledge that the revolution is still coming and figure out how to shift it towards a progressive direction, fight for automatic voter registration, fight for Election Day as a holiday, and expand early voting with a special emphasis on assisting essential workers such as police, nurses, firefighters, etc. in their need for an opportunity to vote), the party must do a better job of supporting the activism of supporters and supporting organizations (where were they on Democracy Day? Where’s the visible, in-person support for all the candidates and all the important issues?).
  • Democracy Day 2017 was briefly discussed. We will begin planning/promoting for 2018 Democracy Day sooner. More time will be spent talking about the solutions instead of just outlining the problems.
  • We discussed the influence of big money in ethanol’s history as well as marijuana’s and how the future looks for both of those issues as well as similar fights.
  • Summer of Labor discussed: letters have been prepared (and have since been mailed out) to local labor leaders asking for their assistance in developing this program. Further discussion on Summer of Labor: we must convey that labor issues are family issues, stability in life is “pro-life”, the Republican Party is pro-division, even the abortion issues is defined in large part by economics.
  • Discussion on growing our membership: more short and fun events in the mold of campaign-style events, seasonally-themed events, voter registration drives, canvassing activism, less emphasis on fundraisers and more outreach to the community.

Democracy Day Speech

The following remarks were delivered by Daniel Crawford in opening the first annual Democracy Day in Newark on September 17th, 2017:

 

 

“Let us recognize that our reasons to convene today are numerous. Beginning with a special – albeit slightly belated – celebration of the 131st Birthday of the Corporate Person. On May 10th, 1886, the Supreme Court – notably with a former railroad industry lawyer, named Morris Remick Waite as Chief Justice – ruled in Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad Company that the Californian County’s decision to levy taxes on the company’s fencing was inappropriate and a violation of that corporation’s supposed equal protection under the law as guaranteed by the 14th Amendment. When the ruling was announced, the Supreme Court’s Recorder – a former railroad company president named J.C. Bancroft Davis – declared in his “headnote” for the case that the Court had affirmed the personhood of corporations. The immediate impact of this change was – as John Witt, a professor in law and history from Yale Law School put it in an interview with NPR in 2011 – that the Supreme Court later used this precedence to force Congress and State Legislatures to treat corporations as legal, “metaphysical” persons in the early-Twentieth Century.

Before 1886, our Framers and the Supreme Court held a very different view of the concept of Corporate Personhood. Thomas Jefferson repeatedly expressed his disdain for the fact that the originally-proposed Constitution did not offer a “restriction of monopolies”, and then later rejoiced when the Bill of Rights were ratified that monopolies were – in his estimation – going to be restrained. Thomas Paine once said “[i]t has been thought that government is a compact between those who govern and those who are governed; but this cannot be true, because it is putting the effect before the cause; for as man must have existed before governments existed, there necessarily was a time when governments did not exist, and consequently there could originally exist no governors to form such a compact with. The fact therefore must be, that the individuals themselves, each in his own personal and sovereign right, entered into a compact with each other to produce a government: and this is the only mode in which governments have a right to arise, and the only principle on which they have a right to exist.”

What you encounter with the concerns of Jefferson and Paine – among others – was a desire to respect and protect the power of the people. Jefferson knew that the unchecked might of consolidated power in economics or politics was problematic for the common man. Paine was conveying a reminder that all institutions of humanity’s creation ought to always remain subordinate to the people…living, breathing people. While we have never had a pure democracy with direct control by the masses, our experiment with representative democracy in this American Republic commands that we vigilantly defend popular sovereignty from the corrosive tendencies of those whom desire to usurp our collective authority for their selfish empowerment and enrichment.

In the decades after the nation’s founding, the standard view of corporations as lifeless creatures of the people was plainly upheld in legal precedence. The Legendary Chief Justice John Marshall expressed in the 1819 Dartmouth College v. Woodward ruling that “[a] corporation is an artificial being, invisible, intangible, and existing only in contemplation of law. Being the mere creature of law, it possesses only those properties which the charter of its creation confers upon it.” Later on, the rather infamous Chief Justice Roger Taney said the following in the 1839 Bank of Augusta v. Earle ruling:  “A corporation can have no legal existence out of the boundaries of the sovereignty by which it is created. It exists only in contemplation of law and by force of the law.” He then added further that a corporation “…is indeed a mere artificial being.”

Furthermore, an NPR article by Nina Totenberg published on July 28th, 2014 – entitled “When Did Companies Become People? Excavating the Legal Evolution” – it was noted, per the input of a legal historian, that corporations initially only had “the right to have their contracts respected by the government”. What changed, though, was that the industrialization of our country compelled many corporations, particularly those involved in railroads, to push for an expansion of corporate rights. Even so, after the ruling in 1886, corporate rights were limited for quite some time; as the court – for instance – had ruled – per the 1906 Hale v. Henkle case – that corporations had no claim to the right of individuals to “plead the fifth” in criminal cases because they were artificial creatures of the state and required monitoring.

In 1907, Congress had even passed a law forbidding corporate involvement in political campaigns on the federal level in the aftermath of a corruption scandal of a then-recent presidential election.  Interestingly, in the Flint v. Stone Tracy Co. ruling of 1911, the Supreme Court determined that the corporate income tax imposed was constitutional although a personal income tax was forbidden by the Constitution at the time. Then, in the 1978 First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti ruling, the Supreme Court ruled that a Massachusetts law prohibiting the bank’s contributions to an effort to defeat a ballot issue on tax policy was unconstitutional. As a result, states lost their power to prevent corporate entities from influencing ballot measures.

Then came the culmination of recent events. In 2010, the Supreme Court handed down a remarkably destabilizing ruling in the Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission case. In that case, a film made for the 2008 Election cycle, entitled “Hillary: The Movie”, had violated a law passed in 2002 – popularly known as “McCain-Feingold” – on bipartisan grounds that was meant to – in part – curb corporate attempts to influence an election from their treasuries. In this particular ruling, the Supreme Court decided that corporations are “people” with a legal right to “speak” via their expenditure of money so as to influence an election. Four years later, the Supreme Court further compounded this problem of misconstruing the expenditure of money as an expression of speech by ruling in McCutcheon v. Federal Elections Commission that the same aforementioned law at issue in “Citizens United” violated the First Amendment by restricting an individual’s ability to donate to a collection of political campaigns.

Since the 2010 ruling, we have seen the creation of so-called Super-PACs, which are assembled mostly by corporate interests to funnel unlimited amounts of money into an effort to influence our elections. 2012 was the first major experiment with this new phenomenon and saw – at one point – each of the major candidates for president supported by a billionaire or group of billionaires via one of these monstrous political action committees. None of these billionaires or millionaires contributing mountains of money into these committees are doing it for sport. You don’t invest a lot of money into a cause unless you expect beneficial results.

If corporations are people, then we should be forgiven to expect that these “legal persons” can be tried and punished for murder. I do not say this to be facetious, but rather to seriously suggest that anyone whose death is caused by the actions of a corporation should conceivably receive justice by way of every board member of said corporation facing indictment for involuntary manslaughter at an absolute minimum. Why every board member? Why not? Do they not, collectively, comprise the corporation? If not, then which single member of the board should bear all the responsibilities for the actions of their larger “legal person”? The C.E.O.? The Chairman? Where does the corporate person begin and end?

If money equals speech, then it would be equally logical to suggest that a poor person has less “speech” than a wealthy person. Basically, the fatter your wallet the more political power you are entitled to have. This is the beginning of the erosion of our democracy; when we establish barriers between the people and their government. If this path continues uninterrupted, democracy will give way to oligarchy; which is to say that the wealthy alone will control the reins of power with our democratic power existing only as a rubber stamp of their predetermined will or – at the very least – to provide us a choice between one oligarch faction’s vision and another’s.

The second reason for being here is to remember and celebrate the federalist Constitution which governs our current political order. 230 years ago today, the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the document we now observe as they sent it to the original thirteen states for ratification. One of the amazing features of this relatively new form of government is that the Founding Fathers – understanding that societies evolve and with that evolution comes a necessity for the governing body to adapt – provided a means by which we can alter the foundation thereof. Article V instructs us on how to make amendments – which we have done 27 times, with the most recent addition occurring almost 30 years ago -, with the safest means starting with a two-thirds vote in both Houses of Congress and the most radical means triggering an amendment via two-thirds – or 34 – of the states calling for a Constitutional Convention. Regardless of the path for amendment, three-fourths – or 38 – of the states are needed to ratify any changes.

Let us consider why a Constitutional Amendment clarifying that Money is not speech and that Corporations are not people is essential. While laws can be tweaked to comply with a Court ruling, and while new Courts can rule on a future case and reverse these problematic interpretations of the Constitution, only a Constitutional Amendment can permanently rectify a constitutional crisis of this magnitude. In times past, the Constitution has been amended to rectify what the regular order was incapable of addressing. This is because certain past amendments were essential to fix a fatal flaw within the system as it had existed in the past.

Political chaos in the election of President Thomas Jefferson necessitated an amendment to dispense with the original design flaw of choosing our presidents. A Supreme Court ruling in 1793’s Chisholm v. Georgia case pertaining to a lawsuit between a citizen of South Carolina and the state of Georgia had held that citizens of one state could sue another state, and the political uproar that this caused – as a threat to the sovereignty to each state – warranted another corrective Constitutional Amendment. There are more examples that a lengthier presentation could offer, but these two particular instances of amending the Constitution to remedy a flaw produced from our past imperfection took place within the lifetimes of our nation’s founding generation.

The dual threats of corporate personhood and perceiving money as speech pose the latest threat to the stability and functionality of our political system. This government was created for us, all of us, not just a few. These rulings on the supposed rights of artificial entities and monetized speech, starting from 1886 through to 2014, have presented us with a genuine crisis requiring our immediate attention. So, let us have a piece of cake, present our written and/or oral testimony, and then send a resounding message to our elected officials in Columbus and Washington that the time to act on an Amendment is here.

Thank you.”

Progressive Meeting Review for September and Tentative Agenda for October Meeting

Agenda for Monthly Progressive Business Meeting

10/3/17

7-9pm

24 Mill St., Newark, OH

 

  • Introduction (10 Mins. 7:00-7:10)
  • Fair Districts = Fair Elections  (10 Mins. 7:10-7:20)
  • Reforming the party (30 Mins. 7:20-7:50)
  • Democracy Day Recap/Future (10 Mins. 7:50-8:00)
  • Summer of Labor (30 Mins. 8:00-8:30)
  • Growing our membership and inspiring activism (20 Mins. 8:30-8:50)
  • Miscellaneous (10 Mins. 8:50-9:00)
  • Adjourn (9:00)

 

 

Review of Progressive Meeting

9/5/17

 

  • We discussed and made final plans for the then-upcoming first annual “Democracy Day” event. Noted that it would feature a celebration of the oldest person’s birthday, the “corporate person”.
  • The Fair Districts = Fair Elections initiative was discussed, noting that 305,000 valid signatures are needed, with 44 counties needing to represent 5% of the share. Apparently, Franklin and Licking Counties have passed the threshold and are pursuing a signature buffer. There are reportedly other states pushing similar initiatives, including Michigan, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina.
  • Extending from the highlights of the aforementioned gerrymandering reform effort was a further discussion on the Congressional district as it currently exists. There was a great deal of frustration with a perception that the Party (more on the state and national levels) has almost completely given up on winning the 12th Congressional District and others like it. The feeling is that the argument of “gerrymandered districts” is used as an excuse for the party to not try to win. In truth, it was agreed that we absolutely can not sit around and wait for “Fair Districts” to succeed and be implemented (in 2022 at the earliest) before we fight for this district by standing up for working people.
  • Among the discussed reforms needed within the Democratic Party at every level – as we have addressed many times – is to cease shutting people out and stop appearing to play favorites.
  • It was noted that we may be losing a lot of working class voters with the “resist” message. Not that it isn’t important to combat fascism and other rightwing views, but many view the message of “resist” as obnoxious and somewhat elitist. People want more than a message of opposition. They want specifics.
  • Some examples of local problems that we can take a position to combat against: a disturbing number of the Newark School District depends on food assistance because of deep poverty, children are neglected because of broken families, and many families are broken because of terrible economic policies.
  • We discussed that part of how we win is by acknowledging that a lot of Trump voters have been hurting in very real ways for a long time, feeling what has been negatively impacting our collective family, and the right has seized their frustrations and misdirected those emotions via the politics of division. Part of the pain experienced by the Trump base can be seen with outsourcing and automation, for instance, Tesla is reportedly building automated factories out West and corporate boards are regularly talking about automation. In summary, we have to acknowledge where we failed to sway the winnable Trump voters.
  • Senator Brown’s then-apparent opposition to Medicare-for-All was contemplated after one of our members had had a chance to discuss the issue with him in person.
  • We talked a bit about linking the Democracy Day event with the Summer of Labor series. Our desire is to reach out to local labor unions and see if they would be interested in helping to coordinate a Summer of Labor Series of events starting next summer and if they would like to help host a Labor/Working Class-themed Harvest event in October of this year (maybe even annually) complete with family-oriented entertainment such as bobbing for apples (there were other suggestions, but the exciting speed with which the ideas were bouncing off of everyone was difficult to keep sufficient notes). The hope is that the cost of all of this would be spread out amongst us. Other discussion on the Summer of Labor Series touched on: connecting unions with the notion that it benefits the family, encouraging people to start a union, address current trends on the fight for labor rights, possibly include a Q&A panel event to cap off September of each year or maybe even to cap off each month. (idea is still in development), possibly see if Farmer’s Market will permit us to be there.
  • In talking about other likeminded groups, we talked about how Indivisible 12 East needs clerical volunteers.

For Your Information

Recent bullet points of local information you might want to know, but may have missed:

 

  • A series of brainstorming/planning sessions for the Licking County Progressives occurred in August and dealt with the following:

 

1)      Democracy Day 2017 (Sunday, September 17th):

  1. a) Time and Location of event: 1-5pm (actual event is 2-4pm, hour before and after for set up and clean up), Main Newark Public Library at 101 W. Main St., Meeting Room A
  2. b) Birthday Celebration for the “Oldest Corporate Person” (we will obtain a cake from a local baker), and we will try to make some drinks available as well
  3. c) Presentation on Money in Politics: complete with the history of the issue (pre-2010), remarks on the Citizens United and McCutcheon rulings, highlighting how the oligarchs on both sides of the political spectrum (The Koch Brothers and Warren Buffett, for example) are empowered over average people, and discussing the increasing cost of our elections – at each level – before and after the controversial rulings in this decade and even the potential corruptive influence that this method of financing elections has on the process, we will also address why amending the constitution is the best option versus standard legislative action or even doing nothing
  4. d) We will note that a petition for Fair Districts = Fair Elections will be outside of the library if that petition is still in circulation
  5. e) Time permitting, each participating citizen will have 5 minutes to speak (and we will keep time) on the issue
  6. f) We will plan to have information available with respect to current Amendment sponsors at each level of government and on how the Constitution is amended (different paths for starting such, the pros and cons of a convention, and how amendments are ratified, and we will attempt to reference more sources for helpful information on this issue
  7. g) We will encourage participants to contacts our state and federal elected officials to promote a constitutional amendment

2)      Summer of Labor

  1. a) The plan is to kick off a preview of what is to come via a Month of Labor in September 2017 with the Labor Day parade.
  2. b) Make a connection between Democracy Day and the theme of a “Labor Month” by noting how “Democracy” means “us” (the people) and how organized labor/unions is “social democracy” and how “Citizens United” is an attack on all forms of democracy via a coup orchestrated by the oligarchs
  3. c) On Labor Day, in an idea originally proposed by the current Licking County Democratic Club President, we should advocate for the participation of all members of the Licking County working class, and encourage them to proudly wear their respective work uniforms no matter where they work and regardless of whether they have a union, to carry a pro-Labor sign and/or wear a shirt supporting such, and in this parade we will look to encourage participants to march alongside the Labor Council and other working class-friendly groups
  4. d) Throughout the Month/Summer of Labor, we ought to emphasize that casual dress is nothing to be ashamed of, since it is a hallmark of the working class since not everyone can afford to dress formally
  5. e) Introduce some kind of labor-oriented panel discussion towards the end of the month, possibly with a featured/educated speaker with expertise on the issues affecting the working class
  6. f) The ideal model for the Month of Labor in 2017 and for each of the four months in any future “Summer of Labor” would be as follows: a parade (or some other festive working class event), an event for working class outreach (complete with sharing opportunities for work, info on organizing, and labor education, but this event would be replaced with the Democracy Day event each September if there isn’t enough interest in hosting four events that month), and a Working Class/Labor Panel discussion event with a featured speaker (if possible)
  7. g) A representative from Working America has expressed interest in helping to organize these events and they recommend that we seek the help of the AFL-CIO as well as the Blue-Green Alliance (Jobs of the Future)
  8. h) An open invitation to local candidates may be extended
  9. i) We will look to advertise for these events (via fliers and paid ads) wherever we can find the eyes and ears of working class citizens, there will be an ad in the newspaper

For Your Information: Labor Day Parade, Summer of Labor, and the Inaugural Newark Democracy Day!

Hello progressives! There were no regular meetings in August for the Licking County Progressives, but there were a set of planning meetings for the Summer of Labor and the upcoming Democracy Day (details via notes taken at both meetings to come this week, I’m running late due to a busy schedule). While you wait for more details on what those planning sessions produced, here are some important dates to take note of for September:

  1. September 4th, Monday: The Newark Labor Day Parade (enter the parade starting at King Avenue in Newark, via Moull St., and it convenes starting at 10am), the parade will go from Granville St. to South 5th. We are hoping that a diverse membership of the local working class will partake wearing their respective work attire to proudly represent how they survive (or attempt to survive) in this economy. All participants are further encouraged to make signs promoting unions, the working class, demanding action on income inequality, promoting the Summer of Labor and/or Democracy Day (details below, you can call me at 740-618-0647 for more information on what I mean here), and even advocating for the Licking County Progressives!
  2. September 5th, Tuesday: The next regular monthly business meeting of the Licking County Progressives, starts at 7pm (24 Mill St. [the Church Building], Newark, OH), we would love to hear your input about the current status and the future of progressivism in the area!
  3. September 17th, Sunday: The Inaugural Newark Democracy Day! 2pm-4pm in Meeting Room A at the Newark Public Library. During this event – inspired by the Move to Amend movement to overturn the 2010 “Citizens United” Ruling -, we will be opening with a 15 minute presentation, granting at least 5 minutes (subject to change, depending on the time) for every participating citizen to speak on the issue of money in politics, and will host a birthday party for the oldest “corporate person” *wink wink*!
  4. Sometime later in the month, as you will see via the more detailed notes to come, we hope to host at least one more event for this “Month of Labor” (which will serve as a preview of what to expect with a series of “Summer of Labor” events), so stay tuned!

Onward Progressives!

For Your Information

Recent bullet points of local information you might want to know, but may have missed:

 

  • A representative of Working America – a community affiliate of the AFL-CIO which helps fight for the rights of working people whom aren’t lucky enough to have a union – spoke at the Democratic Club meeting and even touched based with me (Daniel Crawford) about coordinating our two groups in the near future.
  • A newly-announced candidate for Congress in the 12th District, a teacher named John Peters, also addressed the Democratic Club with a fiery speech aimed at taking the fight right to Congressman Tiberi.

For Your Information

Recent bullet points of local information you might want to know, but may have missed:

 

  • Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Connie Pillich visited Licking County and spoke to local Democrats. As part of her commentary, she noted her support for “Medicaid for all” that citizens of Ohio should be able to buy into.
  • Newark City Councilman Jeremy Blake, whom had previously been prepping a run for State Treasurer – even visiting multiple counties in the months leading up to now – suddenly announced a bid for State Representative for Ohio’s 71st District. Note: another candidate has announced for State Treasurer.